expungement

  • Photo of Can You Join the Military With a Felony?

    Can You Join the Military With a Felony?

    You can, at times, join the military with a felony. While the army does recruit convicted criminals, there are certain obstacles that applicants may face, including disciplinary and security concerns. Yet if you successfully finished your sentence and demonstrated improvement, you can apply for a waiver.

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  • Photo of What Is a Misdemeanor?

    What Is a Misdemeanor?

    A misdemeanor's definition depends on your state's laws and policies. Moreover, the federal government has its own way of classifying and defining misdemeanors. In this article, we will outline all the noteworthy information that misdemeanants, suspects, and/or their families need to know.

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  • Photo of Can You Vote If You Have a Felony?

    Can You Vote If You Have a Felony?

    At the end of the day, you certainly can vote if you have a felony. It is just as important as your other rights, including access to a lawyer and due process protections. However, based on where they live, some felons may have a larger mountain to climb than others.

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  • Photo of How to Restore Your Gun Rights

    How to Restore Your Gun Rights

    The main four options tend to be via expunging the felony, getting a pardon, restoring your civil rights, and/or filing an appeal with the FBI.

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  • Photo of Consequences of a Felony Conviction & Your Rights as a Felon

    Consequences of a Felony Conviction & Your Rights as a Felon

    A felony charge results in much more severe penalties than those of misdemeanors. Because of this, punishments are going to be longer, fines will be higher, and there are consequences that will follow through the rest of a felon's life - such as loss of rights and stigmas.

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  • Photo of How to Expunge a Felony

    How to Expunge a Felony

    According to a study in 2010, nearly eight percent of the population has a felony conviction. This comes with a felony on record for life, unless actions are taken to have them removed or the records sealed. California, Colorado, Kansas, Maryland, Massachusetts, Montana, Nevada, New Hampshire, New York, Texas, and Washington remove a felony from record after seven years. In…

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